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Processed Cheese

Stephen Wright

From an "astonishing" writer (Toni Morrison), the savagely funny story of a couple who unexpectedly come into some money in a wealth-obsessed America deranged by Mammon.

A bag of money drops out of the sky, literally, into the path of a cash-starved citizen named Graveyard. He carries it home to his wife, Ambience, and they embark on the adventure of their lives, finally able to have everything they've always thought they deserved: cars, guns, games, jewels, clothes -- and of course sex, travel, and time with friends and family. There is no limit except their imagination and the hours in the day, and even those seem to be subject to their control.

Of course, the owner of the bag is searching for it, and will do whatever is necessary to get it back. And, of course, these new riches change everything -- and nothing at all.

Darkly hilarious, Processed Cheese is both satire and serious as death. It's a road novel, a family story, and a last-girl-standing thriller of once-in-a-generation vitality and inventiveness. With the clarity of a Swift or a Melville, Wright has created a funhouse-mirror drama that puts all the chips on the table and every bullet in the clip, down to the last breathtaking moment.

Nice Girls Don't Speak Up or Stand Out

Lois P. Frankel, PhD

Discover the "must-listen for every smart, capable woman who wants to succeed"-a guide on how to communicate with maximum impact in the workplace that's the new book in the New York Times bestselling Nice Girls Don't series (Anne Fisher, Fortune.com).

How many times have you asked yourself why you didn't speak up in a meeting? Or pushed for the raise you deserved? Or agreed to take on someone else's task because you didn't want to rock the boat? Whether the answer is once or ten times or more, the reason is the same: It's because you're a nice girl who goes along to get along. But staying quiet and being ignored are not paths to achievement.

Now, in Nice Girls Don't Speak Up or Stand Out, Dr. Lois Frankel shows you how to be an effective communicator and advocate for yourself. From the basics of speaking up to navigating sticky situations and mastering the art of influencing others, this audiobook provides step-by-step advice using real-life examples and powerful tools such as:

  • Be a broken record
  • Choose powerful word
  • Never say no
  • Enlist advocates
  • And many more -- in bonus materials for extra tools in your pocket

Dr Frankel chose the format of this new audio-first work carefully, with the mission of creating an interactive and impactful listen, interweaved with actionable recommendations, real-life anecdotes, and concrete examples of not only what to say in various scenarios, but how to say it. Nice Girls Don't Speak Up or Stand Out dives deeply into nearly one hundred everyday challenges women face related to communication.

With Dr. Lois Frankel as your guide, you can learn how to express yourself confidently, courageously, and clearly -- and start taking charge of your career.



Processed Cheese

Stephen Wright

From an "astonishing" writer (Toni Morrison), the savagely funny story of a couple who unexpectedly come into some money in a wealth-obsessed America deranged by Mammon.

A bag of money drops out of the sky, literally, into the path of a cash-starved citizen named Graveyard. He carries it home to his wife, Ambience, and they embark on the adventure of their lives, finally able to have everything they've always thought they deserved: cars, guns, games, jewels, clothes -- and of course sex, travel, and time with friends and family. There is no limit except their imagination and the hours in the day, and even those seem to be subject to their control.

Of course, the owner of the bag is searching for it, and will do whatever is necessary to get it back. And, of course, these new riches change everything -- and nothing at all.

Darkly hilarious, Processed Cheese is both satire and serious as death. It's a road novel, a family story, and a last-girl-standing thriller of once-in-a-generation vitality and inventiveness. With the clarity of a Swift or a Melville, Wright has created a funhouse-mirror drama that puts all the chips on the table and every bullet in the clip, down to the last breathtaking moment.

No Stopping Us Now

Gail Collins

"Gail Collins inspires women to embrace aging and look at it with a new sense of hope" in thislively, fascinating, eye-opening look at women and aging in America, by the beloved New York Times columnist (Parade Magazine)

"You're not getting older, you're getting better," or so promised the famous 1970's ad--for women's hair dye. Americans have always had a complicated relationship with aging: embrace it, deny it, defer it--and women have been on the front lines of the battle, willingly or not.

In her lively social history of American women and aging, acclaimed New York Times columnist Gail Collins illustrates the ways in which age is an arbitrary concept that has swung back and forth over the centuries. From Plymouth Rock (when a woman was considered marriageable if "civil and under fifty years of age"), to a few generations later, when they were quietly retired to elderdom once they had passed the optimum age for reproduction, to recent decades when freedom from striving in the workplace and caretaking at home is often celebrated, to the first female nominee for president, American attitudes towards age have been a moving target. Gail Collins gives women reason to expect the best of their golden years.

The 19th Christmas

James Patterson

#1 New York Times bestseller --
If the Women's Murder Club can't be together this Christmas, a killer is to blame.

As the holidays approach, Detective Lindsay Boxer and her friends in the Women's Murder Club have much to celebrate. Crime is down. The medical examiner's office is quiet. Even the courts are showing some Christmas spirit. And the news cycle is so slow that journalist Cindy Thomas is on assignment to tell a story about the true meaning of the season for San Francisco.

Then a fearsome criminal known only as "Loman" seizes control of the headlines. Solving crimes never happens on schedule, but as this criminal mastermind unleashes credible threats by the hour, the month of December is upended for the Women's Murder Club. Avoiding tragedy is the only holiday miracle they seek.

Processed Cheese

Stephen Wright

From an "astonishing" writer (Toni Morrison), the savagely funny story of a couple who unexpectedly come into some money in a wealth-obsessed America deranged by Mammon.

A bag of money drops out of the sky, literally, into the path of a cash-starved citizen named Graveyard. He carries it home to his wife, Ambience, and they embark on the adventure of their lives, finally able to have everything they've always thought they deserved: cars, guns, games, jewels, clothes -- and of course sex, travel, and time with friends and family. There is no limit except their imagination and the hours in the day, and even those seem to be subject to their control.

Of course, the owner of the bag is searching for it, and will do whatever is necessary to get it back. And, of course, these new riches change everything -- and nothing at all.

Darkly hilarious, Processed Cheese is both satire and serious as death. It's a road novel, a family story, and a last-girl-standing thriller of once-in-a-generation vitality and inventiveness. With the clarity of a Swift or a Melville, Wright has created a funhouse-mirror drama that puts all the chips on the table and every bullet in the clip, down to the last breathtaking moment.

For the Love of Peanuts

Elizabeth Anne Hartman

A gorgeous, coffee-table collection that captures the energy, excitement, and, of course, the love, behind Peanuts first-ever partnership and public art exhibition with seven major internationally renowned artists including Nina Chanel Abney, AVAF (Assume Vivid Astro Focus), FriendsWithYou, Mr. A (Andre Saraiva), Tomokazu Matsuyama, Rob Pruitt, and Kenny Scharf.

Launched in early 2018, the Peanuts Global Artist Collective--which features dozens of specially commissioned pieces by seven high-profile distinguished artists--has been an international sensation that includes major public art displays in more than seven cities around the world, as well as product and retail partnerships.

The artists selected to reinterpret the work of Charles Schulz are Nina Chanel Abney, AVAF (Assume Vivid Astro Focus), FriendsWithYou, Mr. A (Andre Saraiva), Tomokazu Matsuyama, Rob Pruitt, and Kenny Scharf.

This beautifully designed and illustrated tie-in book collects the original works by each artist as well as interviews and information on what inspired their unique and delightful renditions of our favorite Peanuts characters. It also includes behind-the-scenes imagery and rarely seen material from the Peanuts archive.




Talking to Strangers

Malcolm Gladwell

A Best Book of the Year: The Financial Times, Bloomberg, Chicago Tribune, and Detroit Free Pres

Malcolm Gladwell, host of the podcast Revisionist History and author of the #1 New York Times bestseller Outliers, offers a powerful examination of our interactions with strangers -- and why they often go wrong.

How did Fidel Castro fool the CIA for a generation? Why did Neville Chamberlain think he could trust Adolf Hitler? Why are campus sexual assaults on the rise? Do television sitcoms teach us something about the way we relate to each other that isn't true?

While tackling these questions, Malcolm Gladwell was not solely writing a book for the page. He was also producing for the ear. In the audiobook version of Talking to Strangers, you'll hear the voices of people he interviewed--scientists, criminologists, military psychologists. Court transcripts are brought to life with re-enactments. You actually hear the contentious arrest of Sandra Bland by the side of the road in Texas. As Gladwell revisits the deceptions of Bernie Madoff, the trial of Amanda Knox, and the suicide of Sylvia Plath, you hear directly from many of the players in these real-life tragedies. There's even a theme song - Janelle Monae's "Hell You Talmbout."

Something is very wrong, Gladwell argues, with the tools and strategies we use to make sense of people we don't know. And because we don't know how to talk to strangers, we are inviting conflict and misunderstanding in ways that have a profound effect on our lives and our world.

The Inn

James Patterson

James Patterson's strongest team since the Women's Murder Club are the first responders when their seafront town is targeted by vicious criminals.

The Inn at Gloucester stands alone on the rocky shoreline. Its seclusion suits former Boston police detective Bill Robinson, novice owner and innkeeper. As long as the dozen residents pay their rent, Robinson doesn't ask any questions. Neither does Sheriff Clayton Spears, who lives on the second floor.

Then Mitchell Cline arrives, with a deadly new way of doing business. His crew of local killers break laws, deal drugs, and bring violence to the doors of the Inn. That's when Robinson realizes, with the help of journalist Susan Solie, that leaving the city is no escape from the reality of evil -- or the responsibility for action.

Teaming up with Sheriff Spears and two fearless residents -- Army veteran Nick Jones and groundskeeper Effie Johnson -- Robinson begins a risky defense. The solitary inhabitants of the Inn will have to learn, before time runs out, that their only choice is between standing together -- or dying alone.