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Gaijin: American Prisoner of War

Gaijin: American Prisoner of War

San Francisco, 1941: America has just declared war on Japan.

With a white mother and a Japanese father, Koji Miyamoto quickly realizes that his home is no longer a welcoming one. Streetcars won’t stop for Koji, and his classmates accuse him of being an enemy spy. When a letter arrives from the government notifying him that he must go to a relocation center for Japanese Americans, he and his mother are forced to leave everything they know behind. Once there, Koji soon discovers that being half white in the internment camp is just as difficult as being half Japanese in San Francisco.
Koji’s story,
based on true events, is brought to life by Matt Faulkner’s cinematic illustrations, which reveal Koji struggling to find his place in a tumultuous world-one where he is a prisoner of war in his own country.
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Genre: Children's Books / Juvenile Fiction / Comics & Graphic Novels / Historical

On Sale: October 15th 2019

Price: $14.99 / $19.49 (CAD)

Page Count: 144

ISBN-13: 9781368054164

What's Inside

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Reader Reviews

Praise

2014 APALA Asian/Pacific American Award for Literature Winner
2014 ALSC Graphic Novels Reading List
2015 Bank Street Best Children's Book of the Year
"Powerful . . . Matt Faulkner tells his tale with fierce graphics and moving delicacy."—George Takei
"Amazing art and a moving story drew me into this compelling, historically important graphic novel."—Graham Salisbury, author of Under the Blood-Red Sun, winner of the Scott O'Dell Award for Historical Fiction
"Matt Faulkner has crafted a beautifully drawn novel that simmers with rage."—Matt Phelan, author-illustrator of The Storm in the Barn, winner of the Scott O'Dell Award for Historical Fiction
"This is an important book that should be in every collection."—VOYA
"An accessible account about a dark-and still too-little-known-moment in American history."—Kirkus Reviews
"Vivid and compelling."—Horn Book
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