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In the sequel to Alan Lawrence Sitomer’s “Mean Girls meets Revenge of the Nerds” (Publishers Weekly) The Rise of the Dorkasaurus, the Nerd Girls are back, and though they hope to leave behind all the drama with the popular girls, there may still be a score to settle.

Fed up with the perpetual infighting, the school principal insists that if the two groups want to continue to “compete” with one another, they will do so in a productive manner and thus forces all six girls, Nerd Girls and ThreePees, to participate in the Academic Septhalon. But Maureen has family troubles. And issues of self-esteem. And a desire to bury her head in the sand and pretend that all of the very real issues she’s facing as a kid who is now growing up are not really happening to her.

Are cupcakes, a sarcastic sense of humor and a hope that it will all “just go away” on its own enough to get Maureen through eighth grade? Will Beanpole wake up and smell the coffee? Will Alice really be able to cure herself of the allergies that plague her?

It’s A Catastrophe of Nerdish Proportions, a fast-paced, funny, foray back into the lives of the three nerds we got to know and love in Nerd Girls: The Rise of the Dorkasaurus.

What's Inside

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Reader Reviews

Praise

Praise for A Catastrophe of Nerdish Proportions:

"[A] captivating drama . . . 'Nerds rule' in this satisfying sequel."
Kirkus Reviews
"Sitomer's insight into the world of eighth-grade girls is hilarious, surprising, and painfully realistic."—Booklist
Praise for The Rise of the Dorkasaurus:

"With a keen eye, Sitomer portrays the callous social hierarchy of middle school. . . .readers will be cheering for these girls as they bravely go forth, proudly proclaiming their nerdiness."
Kirkus Reviews
"Mean Girls meets Revenge of the Nerds, middle-school style, in a novel that peeks into the lives of an offbeat cast of 13-year-olds."
Publishers Weekly
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