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Getting Away from Already Being Pretty Much Away from It All

Getting Away from Already Being Pretty Much Away from It All

An Essay

One of David Foster Wallace’s most famous essays, now available as an eBook short.

Beloved for his keen eye, sharp wit, and relentless self-mockery, David Foster Wallace has been celebrated by both critics and fans as the voice of a generation. In this hilarious essay, originally published in the collection A Supposedly Fun Thing I’ll Never Do Again, he ventures to the Illinois State Fair, where he examines butter sculptures, munches on corndogs, and swaps stories with local exhibitors. As he wanders through this endlessly fascinating world, Wallace’s one-of-a-kind blend of humor and insight is on full display. “Getting Away from Already Being Pretty Much Away from It All” is an uproarious and ultimately unforgettable foray into a classic part of American life and culture.
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Genre: Fiction / Humor / Form / Essays

On Sale: April 1st 2012

Price: $1.99

Page Count: 368

ISBN-13: 9780316224772

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Praise

"The Best Mind of His Generation"—A.O. Scott, New York Times
"A prose magician, Mr. Wallace was capable of writing...about subjects from tennis to politics to lobsters, from the horrors of drug withdrawal to the small terrors of life aboard a luxury cruise ship, with humor and fervor and verve. At his best he could write funny, write sad, write sardonic and write serious. He could map the infinite and infinitesimal, the mythic and mundane. He could conjure up an absurd future...while conveying the inroads the absurd has already made in a country where old television shows are a national touchstone and asinine advertisements wallpaper our lives."—Michiko Kakutani, New York Times
"One of the most influential writers of his generation."—Timothy Williams, New York Times
"A novelist with the industrial-strength intellectual chops to theorize even our resolutely anti-intellectual age....Wallace's ear for dialogue was unmatched in contemporary fiction."—Lev Grossman, Time