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Ed Morales

Ed Morales is an author and journalist who has written for The Nation, the New York Times, the Washington Post, Rolling Stone, Jacobin, and the Guardian. He was staff writer at the Village Voice and columnist at Newsday. He is the author of Latinx: The New Force in Politics and  Culture (Verso Books, 2018), Living in Spanglish (St. Martins, 2002), and The Latin Beat: From Rumba to Rock (Da Capo Press, 2003). He was a contributing editor to NACLA Report on the Americas and is a frequent contributor of op-ed columns for the Progressive Media Project.

Morales is also a poet whose work has appeared in Aloud: Voices from the Nuyorican Poets Café (Henry Holt, 1993) and various small magazines, and his fiction has appeared in Iguana Dreams (HarperCollins, 1992), and Boricuas (Ballantine, 1994). He has participated in residencies as a member of Nuyorican Poets Café Live, touring as a spoken-word performer in several cities throughout the east coast, in California, Florida, Texas, and Denmark. Morales has appeared on CNN, Hispanics Today, Urban Latino, HBO Latino, CNN Español, WNBC-TV’s Visiones, WABC’s Tiempo, BBC television and radio, and The Laura Flanders Show, and hosted his own radio show, “Living in Spanglish,” on WBAI-FM in New York from 2015–2018.

Morales was the recipient of a Jerome Fellowship in 1992 to research Latino Theater and from 2006–2007 he was selected for the prestigious Revson Fellowship at Columbia University. While a Revson fellow, he codirected a fifty-five-minute documentary called Whose Barrio? The film was inspired by “Spanish Harlem on His Mind,” an essay published in 2003 in the New York Times and in the anthology New York Stories: The Best of the City Section of the New York Times (NYU Press, 2005). Whose Barrio? premiered in the 2009 New York Latino International Film Festival and won Best Documentary Short at the 2009 Long Island Latino Film Festival.

Morales is a lecturer at Columbia University’s Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race and the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism.

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