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Often I Am Happy

Often I Am Happy

A Novel

This elegant and nuanced literary gem explores the intricacies of friendship, secrets, and two marriages, for fans of The Dinner and Dept. of Speculation.

“Often I am happy and yet I want to cry; / For no heart fully shares my joy.” -B.S. Ingemann

Ellinor is seventy. Her husband Georg has just passed away, and she is struck with the need to confide in someone. She addresses Anna, her long-dead best friend, who was also Georg’s first wife. Fully aware of the absurdity of speaking to someone who cannot hear her, Ellinor nevertheless finds it meaningful to divulge long-held secrets and burdens of her past: her mother’s heartbreaking pride; Ellinor’s courtship with her first husband; their seemingly charmed friendship with Anna and Georg; the disastrous ski trip that shattered the two couples’ lives. Wry and mellow yet infused with subdued emotion, this philosophical, lyrical novel moves in parallel narrative threads while questioning the assumptions we cherish concerning identity and love.
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Genre: Fiction / Fiction / Literary

On Sale: April 11th 2017

Price: $12.99

Page Count: 192

ISBN-13: 9781455570065

What's Inside

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Praise

"A compassionate and often edifying commentary on the elasticity of love, the strength it takes to move forward after a death, and the power of forgiveness."—Publishers Weekly (Starred Review)
"[OFTEN I AM HAPPY] possesses quiet grace."—Kirkus
"The pleasures of this short novel are those of watching a foreign film that transports you to an unfamiliar emotional terrain."—Metro Toronto