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Getting Away from Already Being Pretty Much Away from It All

An Essay

Regular Price $1.99

Regular Price $2.99 CAD

Regular Price $1.99

Regular Price $2.99 CAD

This item is a preorder. Your payment method will be charged immediately, and the product is expected to ship on or around April 1, 2012. This date is subject to change due to shipping delays beyond our control.

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On Sale

Apr 1, 2012

Page Count

368 Pages

ISBN-13

9780316224772

Genre

Nonfiction / Humor / Form / Essays

Description

Beloved for his keen eye, sharp wit, and relentless self-mockery, David Foster Wallace has been celebrated by both critics and fans as the voice of a generation. In this hilarious essay, originally published in the collection A Supposedly Fun Thing I’ll Never Do Again, he chronicles seven days in the Caribbean aboard the m.v. Zenith. As he partakes in supposedly fun activities offered on the luxury tour, he offers riotous anecdotes and unparalleled insight into contemporary American culture.

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Praise

"The Best Mind of His Generation"—A.O. Scott, New York Times
"A prose magician, Mr. Wallace was capable of writing...about subjects from tennis to politics to lobsters, from the horrors of drug withdrawal to the small terrors of life aboard a luxury cruise ship, with humor and fervor and verve. At his best he could write funny, write sad, write sardonic and write serious. He could map the infinite and infinitesimal, the mythic and mundane. He could conjure up an absurd future...while conveying the inroads the absurd has already made in a country where old television shows are a national touchstone and asinine advertisements wallpaper our lives."—Michiko Kakutani, New York Times
"One of the most influential writers of his generation."—Timothy Williams, New York Times
"A novelist with the industrial-strength intellectual chops to theorize even our resolutely anti-intellectual age....Wallace's ear for dialogue was unmatched in contemporary fiction."—Lev Grossman, Time
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