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The Hacked World Order

The Hacked World Order

How Nations Fight, Trade, Maneuver, and Manipulate in the Digital Age

In this updated edition of The Hacked World Order, cybersecurity expert Adam Segal offers unmatched insight into the new, opaque global conflict that is transforming geopolitics.

For more than three hundred years, the world wrestled with conflicts between nation-states, which wielded military force, financial pressure, and diplomatic persuasion to create “world order.” But in 2012, the involvement of the US and Israeli governments in Operation “Olympic Games,” a mission aimed at disrupting the Iranian nuclear program through cyberattacks, was revealed; Russia and China conducted massive cyber-espionage operations; and the world split over the governance of the Internet. Cyberspace became a battlefield.

Cyber warfare demands that the rules of engagement be completely reworked and all the old niceties of diplomacy be recast. Many of the critical resources of statecraft are now in the hands of the private sector, giant technology companies in particular. In this new world order, Segal reveals, power has been well and truly hacked.
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Genre: Nonfiction / Political Science / International Relations

On Sale: September 26th 2017

Price: $18.99

Page Count: 384

ISBN-13: 9781610398725

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Praise

"[Adam Segal] gives us plenty of reasons to wonder how long global powers will keep from going 'nuclear' in cyberspace."--Wall Street Journal

"Segal examines numerous instances of cyberwar, some of which may come as news to readers...Netizens and white-hat programmers will be familiar with Segal's arguments, but most policymakers will not--and they deserve wide discussion."--Kirkus Reviews