Giggle Poetry Reading Lessons

A Successful Reading-Fluency Program Parents and Teachers Can Use to Dramatically Improve Reading Skills and Scores

Contributors

By Amy Buswell

By Bruce Lansky

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Amy Buswell and Bruce Lansky’s Giggle Poetry Reading Lessons turns struggling readers into happy readers — For Grades 2-5.

Many struggling readers are embarrassed to read aloud. They are often intimidated or bored by texts that conventional programs require them to practice. So, instead of catching up, they fall further behind. Currently 67% of American fourth graders can’t read grade-level text. Reading specialist Amy Buswell has spent eight years looking for remediation methods that work. “What is needed,” Buswell explains, “is a program that improves the motivation of struggling readers, because that accounts for 90% of the problem.” Four years ago, Buswell came up with a brainstorm. She knew her best readers enjoyed reading Bruce Lansky’s poetry books for pleasure. The more poems they read, the better the reading got. Why not use Lansky’s kid-tested poems as texts struggling readers could practice on to improve their reading — using six research-based strategies: choral reading, echo reading, paired reading, repeated reading, sustained silent reading and “say it like the character” reading. — This book is the result of that brainstorm and the resulting collaboration between Buswell and Lansky. It gives teachers and parents everything they need to help children improve their reading: -35 kid-tested poems by Bruce Lansky -35 customized reading lessons by Amy Buswell -35 off-the-wall illustrations by Stephen Carpenter -35 sets of zany performance tips by Bruce Lansky — all of which is designed to make the process of reading improvement more like fun than work. — What Amy Buswell and Bruce Lansky have created is the most entertaining fluency intervention ever. That’s why it is so successful at overcoming negative attitudes to improve reading skills and scores. Ninety-five percent of participating students made significant improvement in their fluency (reading rate). And average reading scores on the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT) for Buswell’s school raised her school’s rating to an A for the first time. In 2011, Buswell’s school achieved one of the highest-percentage reading gains in the county. — There’s no reason parents can’t get in on the fun, too. Parents will enjoy Lansky’s funny poems and Stephen Carpenter’s delightful illustrations as much as their children. By reading the poems with their children and encouraging their children to try some of Lansky’s entertaining performance tips (by adding gestures, sound effects, props and finding additional readers: be they friends, family or neighbors), they can dramatically speed up their child’s reading progress (and have lots of fun in the process.)

Excerpt

Table of Contents

Introduction

Research on Fluency

How to Use Giggle Poetry Reading Lessons

Alignment to the Common Core State Standards

Lesson Plan Overview

Lessons and Poems

A Brave Little Fellow Named Brian

Forgetful

No More Flies in the School Kitchen

Scrambled

Poorly Dressed

All You Can Eat Rap

My Brother’s Bear

Bad Hair Day Rap

My Dog Chewed Up My Homework

My Brother Doesn’t Like to Share

My Noisy Brother

Oh, Woe Ith Me!

What I Found in My Desk

What I Did While Watching the Super Bowl

My New Pet

My Dumb Cat

I Want a Younger Brother

Confession

My Dog Has Got No Manners

My Violin

My Dog Is Too Friendly

My Teacher Sees Right Through Me

Dirty Socks

Oops!

Ish!

There’s a New Cook in the Cafeteria

Say What?

Someone’s Toes Are in My Nose

Clear As Mud

What’s So Funny?

New Year’s Resolutions

Turn Off the TV!

Zoo Rules

How to Torture Your Teacher

Betty Botter

Oral Reading & Presentation Rubrics

Author’s Results

Poetry Credits

References




Lessons and Poems




A Brave Little Fellow Named Brian

Performance Tips

 

 

A brave little fellow named Brian

 

went for a ride on a lion.

Hold both hands in front of you and spread your fingers to look like a lion’s claws.

When Brian got bit,

Make one hand look like a lion’s mouth closing as it bites Brian.

the lion got hit.

Punch your right fist into your left hand to get a slapping sound.

So now it’s the lion

Show the lion’s claws again when you say, “lion.”

who’s cryin’.

Make a sad face and trace tears falling from your eyes with both index fingers.




“A Brave Little Fellow Named Brian” Lesson Plan

Objective: The student will read text fluently, with attention to pace and expression and with a high level of accuracy, as a means of comprehending the text.

Procedure:

1. Activate Background Knowledge (1–2 min.): Say to your students, “We all get worried about some things, and sometimes we just have to be brave, like when you go to the doctor to get shots, when you go to the dentist, or when you’re riding on a big roller coaster for the first time. But riding on a lion is very different from going to the dentist or riding on a roller coaster, isn’t it? Why?”

2. Skim/Scan (1–2 min.): Have students underline any troublesome or unfamiliar words.

3. Modeled Reading (5 min.):

• Expression: The narrator is trying to convey how tough he is. Have students listen for feelings of pride as you read the poem.

• Ask if they can identify any lines read with the emotion you were trying to convey.

4. Guided Reading (10 min.):

• Discuss vocabulary words necessary for comprehension:

– Fellow—a boy

• Inference: Ask your students, “Brian was brave to ride on the lion, but what else did he do that makes him even tougher?”

• Thinking Beyond the Text: Ask your students, “Sometimes, what makes a story funny is when something unexpected happens. When Brian got bit, did you expect him to hit the lion or did you expect the lion to cry? What did you expect to happen?”

• Echo read

• Choral read

• Buddy read

5. Independent Reading (5 min.):

• Have students read today’s poem silently or in a quiet voice as many times as they can in 5 minutes to perfect their expression, prosody, accuracy, and pace.

• Assist students as needed. Encourage them to ask for help by reaching their hand out and placing it on the table near you.

6. Oral Reading (5 min.):

• Students volunteer to read today’s poem aloud.

• Student praise is a must!

Assessment: Day 5 (see Lesson Plan Overview) with Oral Reading Rubric and/or Presentation Rubric.




Forgetful

Performance Tips

 

 

My sister woke up in the morning.

 

She had to go potty real bad.

Cross your legs and squirm. Emphasize “real bad.”

I must have forgotten to put the seat down.

Scratch your head like you forgot something.

She fell in the toilet—how sad.

Make a sad face. Emphasize “how sad.”

 

 

She yelled, and she screamed, and she hollered.

Cup your hands around your mouth and yell.

There’s no doubt that she was upset.

 

Whenever my sister is nasty to me,

 

It seems that I always forget.

Put your hands out to the sides, palms up, as if to say, “Sorry.” Emphasize “always forget.”




“Forgetful” Lesson Plan

Objective: The student will read text fluently, with attention to pace and expression and with a high level of accuracy, as a means of comprehending the text.

Procedure:

1. Activate Background Knowledge (1–2 min.): Say to your students, “Everyone forgets things from time to time. Have you ever used ‘I forgot’ as an excuse when you were asked why you didn’t make your bed or do your homework?”

2. Skim/Scan (1–2 min.): Have students underline any troublesome or unfamiliar words.

3. Modeled Reading (5 min.):

• Expression: Have students listen for feelings of seriousness (at the beginning of the poem), sorrow (“—how sad.”), and a fake apology (at the end of the poem).

• Ask if they can match any lines read with the emotion you were trying to convey.

4. Guided Reading (10 min.):

• Discuss vocabulary words that are necessary for comprehension:

Doubt—a feeling of uncertainty

Nasty—(in this context) spiteful or hard to deal with

• Inference: Ask your students, “Would a sister who’s ‘difficult to deal with’ really cause a person to be forgetful?”

• Echo read

• Choral read

• Buddy read

5. Independent Reading (5 min.):

• Have students read today’s poem silently or in a quiet voice as many times as they can in 5 minutes to perfect their expression, prosody, accuracy, and pace.

• Assist students as needed. Encourage them to ask for help by reaching their hand out and placing it on the table near you.

6. Oral Reading (5 min.):

• Students volunteer to read today’s poem aloud.

• Student praise is a must!

Assessment: Day 5 (see Lesson Plan Overview) with Oral Reading Rubric and/or Presentation Rubric.




No More Flies in the School Kitchen

Performance Tips

 

Before you say a word, look around as though a fly is buzzing around your head. Slap your face and say, “Ouch.”

 

There were lots of flies in the kitchen.

Emphasize “lots.”

The cook didn’t know what to do.

 

The principal made an inspection.

 

He swatted some flies with his shoe.

Take off your shoe and swat a “fly” on the desk while you say this line.

 

 

Now there are no flies in the kitchen.

Make a zero with your thumb and index finger.

The cook’s in a very good mood.

 

The flies are not quite so delighted.

 

They died after eating the food.

Say this with a sad face and a sad voice.




“No More Flies in the School Kitchen” Lesson Plan

Objective: The student will read text fluently, with attention to pace and expression and with a high level of accuracy, as a means of comprehending the text.

Procedure:

1. Activate Background Knowledge (1–2 min.): Say to your students, “Some children like to make jokes about the food being served in school cafeterias. How do you feel about the cafeteria food? What’s the worst food they serve in your school cafeteria?”

2. Skim/Scan (1–2 min.): Have students underline any troublesome or unfamiliar words.

3. Modeled Reading (5 min.):

• Expression: Have students listen for feelings of stress/fear (at the beginning of the poem) and humor (at the end of the poem).

• Ask if they can match any lines read with the emotion you were trying to convey.

4. Guided Reading (10 min.):

• Discuss vocabulary words that are necessary for comprehension:

Swatted—hit or slapped

Delighted—happy

• Inference: Ask students, “Does cafeteria food really make flies die? Or is that an exaggeration?”

• Echo read

• Choral read

• Buddy read

5. Independent Reading (5 min.):

• Have students read today’s poem silently or in a quiet voice as many times as they can in 5 minutes to perfect their expression, prosody, accuracy, and pace.

• Assist students as needed. Encourage them to ask for help by reaching their hand out and placing it on the table near you.

6. Oral Reading (5 min.):

• Students volunteer to read today’s poem aloud.

• Student praise is a must!

Assessment: Day 5 (see Lesson Plan Overview) with Oral Reading Rubric and/or Presentation Rubric.




Scrambled

Performance Tips

 

Exaggerate all the movements described below:

I climbed up the door, and

Lift your knees high, as if walking upstairs.

I opened the stairs.

Turn an imaginary doorknob.

I said my pajamas

Put your hands together like you were praying.

and buttoned my prayers.

Pretend to button your shirt.

 

 

I turned off the covers

 

and pulled up the light.

Pretend to pull up the covers.

I’m all scrambled up since

 

She kissed me last night.

Whisper the last line, as though you are shy or embarrassed to admit it. (Feel free to change “she” to “he,” if you like.)




“Scrambled” Lesson Plan

Objective: The student will read text fluently, with attention to pace and expression and with a high level of accuracy, as a means of comprehending the text.

Procedure:

1. Activate Background Knowledge (1–2 min.): Ask your students, “Can you remember a time when you got mixed-up or dizzy when you went on a boat or roller-coaster ride or when you spun around in circles?”

2. Skim/Scan (1–2 min.): Have students underline any troublesome or unfamiliar words.

3. Modeled Reading (5 min.):

• Expression: Read with a hint of silliness.

4. Guided Reading (10 min.):

• Comprehension: Ask students if they understood the poem or understood what the boy was trying to say.

• Inference: Ask your students, “Why would being kissed cause him to be ‘all scrambled up’?”

• Echo read

• Choral read

• Buddy read

5. Independent Reading (5 min.):

• Have students read today’s poem silently or in a quiet voice as many times as they can in 5 minutes to perfect their expression, prosody, accuracy, and pace.

• Assist students as needed. Encourage them to ask for help by reaching their hand out and placing it on the table near you.

6. Oral Reading (5 min.):

• Students volunteer to read today’s poem aloud.

• Student praise is a must!

Assessment: Day 5 (see Lesson Plan Overview) with Oral Reading Rubric and/or Presentation Rubric.




Poorly Dressed

Performance Tips

Genre:

  • “It’s not surprising that the most entertaining remedial reading program would motivate students to read better.”—Chase Young PhD, Assistant Professor, Texas A&M, Corpus Christi
  • “The fluency gains these engaging reading lessons have produced are outstanding.”—Tim Rasinski, PhD, Professor of Literacy Education, Kent State University
  • “What an amazing fluency program! My students were excited to start these lessons. But I was shocked by how quickly m students’ reading improved. As soon as they realized they were starting to improve—that motivated them to improve even more.”—Loraine Sansbury, K-5 Reading Resource Teacher
  • “Within a week of starting this intervention, one of my most challenging students went from an ‘I hate reading’ attitude to saying, ‘Can I read this poem to you?’ It was amazing.”—Kim Fawcett, Grades 4-5 Literacy Teacher

On Sale
Jun 10, 2014
Page Count
96 pages
Publisher
Running Press
ISBN-13
9781476742939

Amy Buswell

About the Author

Amy Buswell is a reading specialist who teaches in West Palm Beach, FL. Her entertaining “reading lessons” have dramatically raised the reading skills and scores of the students who attended schools at which she has taught.

Bruce Lansky has written and edited 18 books of humorous poetry for children, which have sold more than 3.5 million copies. Lansky has visited more than 600 schools, and he also created the popular Giggle Poetry website.

Stephen Carpenter is the illustrator who has helped 16 “Giggle Poetry” books come alive with hilarious illustrations. He lives just outside Kansas City with his wife, Becki, and their sheepdog, Lulu.

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Bruce Lansky

About the Author

Bruce Lansky is the #1 author of baby-name books in North America, selling over 11.5 million copies of baby name books. His other name books include: The Best Baby Name Book in the Whole Wide World, The Very Best Baby Name Book, 60,000+ Baby Names, 25,000+ Baby Names, and 15,000+ Baby Names.

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