Screening Room - Motion Picture Credits

Returning to Hollywood after serving in the Air Force during World War II, Sidney Sheldon wrote an original story, sold it to Dore Schary and wrote the screenplay for it. Called The Bachelor and the Bobby Soxer, and starring Cary Grant, Myrna Loy and Shirley Temple, the film won the 1948 Academy Award® for Best Original Screenplay.

Sheldon remembers, "When casting for the The Bachelor and the Bobby Soxer hit a snag, Cary Grant suggested that I test for the film's second male lead. Assuring me that I would be perfect for the part, Cary arranged for the director to shoot a screen test. The scene was to be between Cary and myself. Since I had written the script, I felt confident that I knew all the lines and could do justice to them. But when Cary fed me my cue, I looked up and saw all the fellows up on the catwalks and behind the cameras, and froze. The next thing I knew, I was running out of the studio. Needless to say the role went to someone else — Rudy Vallee."

Signed by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, where he remained for 12 years as a producer/writer/director, Sheldon collaborated on the screenplay of Easter Parade, which won the Screen Writer's Guild Award for Best Musical of the year. Sheldon won the award the following year as well with his solo screenplay for Annie Get Your Gun. He then wrote and directed Dream Wife, starring Cary Grant and Deborah Kerr.

Recalls Sheldon, "During the filming of Easter Parade, I was on the set talking with one of the film's stars, Judy Garland. I had just started telling her an anecdote, when she was called to begin shooting a scene. Judy ignored the call and urged me to continue my story. I started to talk faster, not wanting to hold up the production, when I suddenly realized that she was stalling for time. 'Judy, is there some reason you don't want to do this scene?' I asked. 'Yes,' she replied, 'In this scene I have to kiss Fred Astaire and I've never met him before.' Everyone had assumed that these two superstars knew each other. I immediately introduced them, and filming was able to resume."

Continuing his tremendous track record as a successful screenwriter, Sheldon moved over to Paramount Pictures, where he wrote Pardners and Never Too Young for Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis before the famous pair split up; Anything Goes with Bing Crosby; and wrote, produced and directed The Buster Keaton Story, starring Donald O'Connor. Sheldon returned briefly to MGM to pen the script for Jumbo, before moving on to a new facet in his writing career — television.

Sidney Sheldon has written over 25 films, including:

South of Panama (1941)
Screenplay

She's in the Army (1942)
Screenplay

The Bachelor and the Bobby Soxer (RKO/1947)
Screenplay
Academy Award® for Best Original Screenplay

Easter Parade (MGM/1948)
Screenplay
Screen Writers Guild Award for Best Musical

Annie Get Your Gun (MGM/1950)
Screenplay
Screen Writers Guild Award for Best Musical

Nancy Goes to Rio (MGM/1950)

Three Guys Named Mike (MGM/1951)
Screenplay

No Questions Asked (1951)
Screenplay

Rich, Young and Pretty (1951)
Screenplay

Just This Once (1952)
Screenplay

Dream Wife (MGM/1953)
Screenplay; Directed

Remains to be Seen (1953)
Screenplay

You're Never Too Young (Paramount/1955)
Screenplay

Pardners (Paramount/1956)
Screenplay

Anything Goes (Paramount/1956)
Screenplay

The Birds and the Bees (1956)
Screenplay

The Buster Keaton Story (Paramount/1957)
Screenplay; Co-produced and directed

All in a Night's Work (Paramount/1961)
Screenplay

Billy Rose's Jumbo (MGM/1962)
Screenplay

The Other Side of Midnight (1977)
Produced by Frank Yablans
starring John Beck, Susan Sarandon and Marie France Pisier

Bloodline (Paramount/1979)
starring Audrey Hepburn, Ben Gazarra, Michelle Phillips, Omar Shariff

The Naked Face (Cannon Films/1984)
starring Roger Moore